FIFA World Cup Goal Celebrations tailor-made for the Dance floor

We all know that the World Cup is one big party, on the field and off it. This year the Cup of the greatest game in the world returns to Brazil - home of the beautiful game and the best parties ever.

Footballers are known for their sweet footwork and graceful moves during the game, but the opportunity to really show off their skills comes around every time a goal is scored. We take a look at some of the best goal celebrations that you could easily steal for the next time you find yourself on the dance floor. Trust us, you won’t feel out of place at all!

 

Tshabalala & friends (South Africa) vs. Mexico - 2010

 

The first goal of the first game of the first World Cup on African soil. Early in the second half, after a brilliant string of passes, Tshabalala finishes clinically and proceeds to lead his team-mates in a perfectly choreographed celebration that they probably worked on almost as much as those passing and shooting skills they displayed moments earlier.

This move can easily be replicated by you and your crew, as long as you plan beforehand.

 

 

Bebeto & Co. (Brazil) vs. Holland - 1994

On scoring the second goal in his country’s quarter final victory over the Dutch, Bebeto is clearly ecstatic, and is joined by Romario and Mazinho in this little ‘rock the baby’ celebration to acknowledge the birth of his third child, just days before the match.

Another move that requires more planning than actual dancing skills.

 

 

Roger Milla (Cameroon) vs. Colombia (and others) - 1990

Cameroon were a pleasant surprise at the 1990 Cup, making it to the quarter-finals. Roger Milla scored 4 goals along the way, and celebrated each one by doing a hip-twisting jig with the nearest corner flag.

A rare move you can pull off on your own. Pretty low on the difficulty scale. If you don’t have the charisma of Milla though, you’d probably end up looking pretty silly.

 

 

Julius Aghahowa (Nigeria) vs. Sweden - 2002

After an impressive leap to head in the opening goal against Sweden, Aghahowa showed off some more aerial skills with a series of backflips that makes you dizzy just watching them.

Off the charts on the difficulty scale. Attempt to replicate only if you’re a trained gymnast, or Aghahowa’s long-lost brother.

 

 

Robert Koren & team (Slovenia) vs. Algeria- 2002

Koren was the beneficiary of a schoolboy error from Algeria’s goalie that gave Slovenia their first ever World Cup goal. After attempting to kick down the corner flag, Koren leads his team in what can only be described as an attempt at a rain dance but it probably could be some move of great significance to the Slovenians. It’s anyone’s guess.

Easy to perform. But if you’re scraping this low at the bottom of the barrel for moves, we suggest stepping off the dance floor for a bit.

 

 

Footballers are an eccentric lot, and their goal celebrations usually have some significance to them. If you intend borrowing a move from one of your favourites, make sure you know what it means. And make sure you watch the World Cup this time around for a lot more goals and a lot more crazy celebrations.

Image Courtesy: telegraph.co.uk

Article by: Viren Fernandes

FIFA World Cup Goal Celebrations tailor-made for the Dance floor

Liveinstyle

We all know that the World Cup is one big party, on the field and off it. This year the Cup of the greatest game in the world returns to Brazil - home of the beautiful game and the best parties ever.

Footballers are known for their sweet footwork and graceful moves during the game, but the opportunity to really show off their skills comes around every time a goal is scored. We take a look at some of the best goal celebrations that you could easily steal for the next time you find yourself on the dance floor. Trust us, you won’t feel out of place at all!

 

Tshabalala & friends (South Africa) vs. Mexico - 2010

 

The first goal of the first game of the first World Cup on African soil. Early in the second half, after a brilliant string of passes, Tshabalala finishes clinically and proceeds to lead his team-mates in a perfectly choreographed celebration that they probably worked on almost as much as those passing and shooting skills they displayed moments earlier.

This move can easily be replicated by you and your crew, as long as you plan beforehand.

 

 

Bebeto & Co. (Brazil) vs. Holland - 1994

On scoring the second goal in his country’s quarter final victory over the Dutch, Bebeto is clearly ecstatic, and is joined by Romario and Mazinho in this little ‘rock the baby’ celebration to acknowledge the birth of his third child, just days before the match.

Another move that requires more planning than actual dancing skills.

 

 

Roger Milla (Cameroon) vs. Colombia (and others) - 1990

Cameroon were a pleasant surprise at the 1990 Cup, making it to the quarter-finals. Roger Milla scored 4 goals along the way, and celebrated each one by doing a hip-twisting jig with the nearest corner flag.

A rare move you can pull off on your own. Pretty low on the difficulty scale. If you don’t have the charisma of Milla though, you’d probably end up looking pretty silly.

 

 

Julius Aghahowa (Nigeria) vs. Sweden - 2002

After an impressive leap to head in the opening goal against Sweden, Aghahowa showed off some more aerial skills with a series of backflips that makes you dizzy just watching them.

Off the charts on the difficulty scale. Attempt to replicate only if you’re a trained gymnast, or Aghahowa’s long-lost brother.

 

 

Robert Koren & team (Slovenia) vs. Algeria- 2002

Koren was the beneficiary of a schoolboy error from Algeria’s goalie that gave Slovenia their first ever World Cup goal. After attempting to kick down the corner flag, Koren leads his team in what can only be described as an attempt at a rain dance but it probably could be some move of great significance to the Slovenians. It’s anyone’s guess.

Easy to perform. But if you’re scraping this low at the bottom of the barrel for moves, we suggest stepping off the dance floor for a bit.

 

 

Footballers are an eccentric lot, and their goal celebrations usually have some significance to them. If you intend borrowing a move from one of your favourites, make sure you know what it means. And make sure you watch the World Cup this time around for a lot more goals and a lot more crazy celebrations.

Image Courtesy: telegraph.co.uk

Article by: Viren Fernandes

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