More Rock & Roll: Weekender Kolkata Stories with Neel Adhikari (Part 2)

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The happiest festival did create a lot of ripples in our little town, Kolkata. All of a sudden, the mood here has changed. Somehow, we’re on the map. And that changes the environment surrounding every band meeting, every practice pad and possibly, in the head of that 'stoned songwriter' who might suddenly decide not to be so stoned anymore. A clearing of the murkiness was required and a sliver of hope would be all that the Kolkata musicians would need. After all NH7 Weekender is the perfect amalgamation of a party and music fest. 

 

 

They got exactly that from the NH7 Kolkata festival. Everyone hopes it’s the first of the many to come; our fingers are crossed that big mommy lets it all happen. We’ve been good kids till now and no fires have broken out, no undergarments have been hurled on to the stage and I’ve heard that NH7 was a drug-free festival in Kolkata.

 

We checked out what some of the artistes felt in the first part of this article. Now, lets see a few more opinions.

 

Q. How could this change the scene in Kolkata for the years ahead to come?

A.

Suyasha Sen (Ganesh Talkies)

“This was the first time that Kolkata witnessed a proper music festival which had multiple stages where artistes performed simultaneously so the next year can only be bigger and better. Hopefully, more festivals will start happening here now.”

Nischay Parekh

“It unifies us with the rest of the independent music community in India. Just on a basic level, it feels right.”

Write In Stereo

“We now know that NH7 Weekender will be a regular affair. That speaks volumes for itself. We can only hope that with the success of the first edition here, people will take notice that there is a market for festival-goers in Kolkata and attempt similar ventures. Jamsteady at Princeton Club and Someplace Else at Park will go on as usual but the need for investors vis-à-vis venues for live music still remains. We are looking forward to a more happening scene in our city in the near future.”

 

Q. What projects are lined up ahead?

A.

 

Suyasha Sen (Ganesh Talkies)

"We are currently in the process of recording a full-length album to be produced by Miti and Neel Adhikari. It should be out in 2014 or early next year."

Nischay Parekh

“More shows, more albums and more fun.”

Write In Stereo

“We plan to record demos at home. Few releases are lined up: ‘TokyoKyoto’ as a single, an EP/Album within this year and a music video, amongst other obligations. We should be also be gigging across the country - both, on the festival as well as the pub circuit.”

 

Q. Your take on the Weekender?

A.

 

Suyasha Sen (Ganesh Talkies)

Uppers:

• Multiple stages which gave people the choice to listen to the music they wanted to..

Downers:

• Not enough international acts.

 

Nischay Parekh

Uppers:

 

• The fact that it happened!

Downers:

• Perhaps the venue was slightly small.

 

Write In Stereo

Uppers:

 

• Turnout, overall vibe, brilliantly organized festival, outstanding music performed by outstanding musicians, portable loos, bucket drinks.

Downers:

• Location of venue, stage-to-stage spill of audio, lack of beer.

 

 

Although there are a few discrepancies about the venue I would like to mention here that this is probably one of the first multistage mutli-artiste full-scale music festivals that happened in Kolkata. So the distance thing is a positive in my books. A certain distance from urbanity is required not only for permissions and lack of interference from the cities everyday life, but also the vibe. The journey to the festival helps the artistes and the audiences enter a different mindset, which is what going to a festival is partly about. It increases our capacity to hear more music for longer periods of time, while we can unplug from the daily bullshit temporarily.

 

 

 

In the next and concluding part of this article, we’ll see what some very crucial individuals behind the scenes of the Kolkata festival (Nishit Arora, Rohon Ghosh, Margub Ali) have to say. Watch this space.

 

 

 

Article written by Neel Adhikari

 

 

Neel Adhikari is a music director/ singer songwriter from Kolkata. Fiercely independent, Neel has steered clear of the mainstream music industry. A rocker at heart he hosts the Open Mic in Kolkata and plays with two bands 'Neel and the Lightbulbs' and 'Gandu Circus' while helping and inspiring younger musicians in the city.

 

Image Courtesy

 

www.deccanchronicle.com

More Rock & Roll: Weekender Kolkata Stories with Neel Adhikari (Part 2)

Neel Adhikari

 

 

The happiest festival did create a lot of ripples in our little town, Kolkata. All of a sudden, the mood here has changed. Somehow, we’re on the map. And that changes the environment surrounding every band meeting, every practice pad and possibly, in the head of that 'stoned songwriter' who might suddenly decide not to be so stoned anymore. A clearing of the murkiness was required and a sliver of hope would be all that the Kolkata musicians would need. After all NH7 Weekender is the perfect amalgamation of a party and music fest. 

 

 

They got exactly that from the NH7 Kolkata festival. Everyone hopes it’s the first of the many to come; our fingers are crossed that big mommy lets it all happen. We’ve been good kids till now and no fires have broken out, no undergarments have been hurled on to the stage and I’ve heard that NH7 was a drug-free festival in Kolkata.

 

We checked out what some of the artistes felt in the first part of this article. Now, lets see a few more opinions.

 

Q. How could this change the scene in Kolkata for the years ahead to come?

A.

Suyasha Sen (Ganesh Talkies)

“This was the first time that Kolkata witnessed a proper music festival which had multiple stages where artistes performed simultaneously so the next year can only be bigger and better. Hopefully, more festivals will start happening here now.”

Nischay Parekh

“It unifies us with the rest of the independent music community in India. Just on a basic level, it feels right.”

Write In Stereo

“We now know that NH7 Weekender will be a regular affair. That speaks volumes for itself. We can only hope that with the success of the first edition here, people will take notice that there is a market for festival-goers in Kolkata and attempt similar ventures. Jamsteady at Princeton Club and Someplace Else at Park will go on as usual but the need for investors vis-à-vis venues for live music still remains. We are looking forward to a more happening scene in our city in the near future.”

 

Q. What projects are lined up ahead?

A.

 

Suyasha Sen (Ganesh Talkies)

"We are currently in the process of recording a full-length album to be produced by Miti and Neel Adhikari. It should be out in 2014 or early next year."

Nischay Parekh

“More shows, more albums and more fun.”

Write In Stereo

“We plan to record demos at home. Few releases are lined up: ‘TokyoKyoto’ as a single, an EP/Album within this year and a music video, amongst other obligations. We should be also be gigging across the country - both, on the festival as well as the pub circuit.”

 

Q. Your take on the Weekender?

A.

 

Suyasha Sen (Ganesh Talkies)

Uppers:

• Multiple stages which gave people the choice to listen to the music they wanted to..

Downers:

• Not enough international acts.

 

Nischay Parekh

Uppers:

 

• The fact that it happened!

Downers:

• Perhaps the venue was slightly small.

 

Write In Stereo

Uppers:

 

• Turnout, overall vibe, brilliantly organized festival, outstanding music performed by outstanding musicians, portable loos, bucket drinks.

Downers:

• Location of venue, stage-to-stage spill of audio, lack of beer.

 

 

Although there are a few discrepancies about the venue I would like to mention here that this is probably one of the first multistage mutli-artiste full-scale music festivals that happened in Kolkata. So the distance thing is a positive in my books. A certain distance from urbanity is required not only for permissions and lack of interference from the cities everyday life, but also the vibe. The journey to the festival helps the artistes and the audiences enter a different mindset, which is what going to a festival is partly about. It increases our capacity to hear more music for longer periods of time, while we can unplug from the daily bullshit temporarily.

 

 

 

In the next and concluding part of this article, we’ll see what some very crucial individuals behind the scenes of the Kolkata festival (Nishit Arora, Rohon Ghosh, Margub Ali) have to say. Watch this space.

 

 

 

Article written by Neel Adhikari

 

 

Neel Adhikari is a music director/ singer songwriter from Kolkata. Fiercely independent, Neel has steered clear of the mainstream music industry. A rocker at heart he hosts the Open Mic in Kolkata and plays with two bands 'Neel and the Lightbulbs' and 'Gandu Circus' while helping and inspiring younger musicians in the city.

 

Image Courtesy

 

www.deccanchronicle.com

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