Curious New Year Traditions Around The World

As the clock winds down to midnight on the last day of the year, the New Year is welcomed with enthusiasm in all parts of the world. This year, with the company of your Yaars, and McDowell's No.1, here are some (mostly) harmless, curious traditions followed by people (you too can for a change) to bring in the New Year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Costume Parties

New Year revellers in Japan dress as the coming year’s zodiac animal (according to the oriental zodiac calendar, 2015 is the year of the sheep). Buddhist temple bells chime 108 times as the New Year is rung in, supposedly so that 108 different types of human weakness are not carried forward to the next year.

Throwing Furniture

If you plan on starting the new year in South Africa, watch out for falling furniture and appliances! Residents of Johannesburg, throw old furniture and other household items out of their windows on New Year’s Eve in an effort to not be tied down by old attachments in the New Year.

Casting Tin

From throwing furniture, to messing about with molten metal. Finnish people pour melted tin into water at the stroke of the New Year. The tin sets and hardens as it hits the water, and people interpret the resultant shapes and predict how the new year will play out. A ring or a heart shape implies marriage. A pig might signify good food or wealth.

Bare Minimum

You’re probably wondering what you’ll wear this New Year. If you happen to be in Bolivia, Ecuador or some other South American countries, that decision would be way simpler. All you would really have to wear is coloured underwear to determine your fate for the new year. The most popular colours are red for romance, and yellow for wealth.

Fight Club

In some villages in Peru, the locals end the year with a fist fight festival to settle their differences. Way to start the New Year off on a clean slate!

Travel Light

In Colombia people carry empty suitcases around with them, starting New Year’s Eve, to ensure that the coming year is filled with travel and adventure. Sounds like something I should be doing the 31st!

Up in The Air

In Denmark, people climb on top of chairs and welcome the New Year by jumping off at the stroke of midnight, to bring good luck. They (usually) set their drinks down on the table before doing this.

The Power of Loaf

In Ireland people pound the walls of their homes with loaves of bread, to protect themselves from evil spirits.

Graveyard Camp

Locals in central Chile welcome the New Year in the company of their dead relatives. The tradition is said to have started when a family broke in one year to be near their dead father on New Year’s Eve.

As you can see, people around the world have different ways to bring in the New Year. Choose your favourite, make up your own tradition, or mix and match a few from different countries and welcome 2015 with your Yaars, some weird global New Year traditions and a sip of McDowell's No.1!

Image Credit: giphy.com

LiveInStyle.com encourages you to Party Responsibly!

Curious New Year Traditions Around The World

Viren Fernandes

As the clock winds down to midnight on the last day of the year, the New Year is welcomed with enthusiasm in all parts of the world. This year, with the company of your Yaars, and McDowell's No.1, here are some (mostly) harmless, curious traditions followed by people (you too can for a change) to bring in the New Year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Costume Parties

New Year revellers in Japan dress as the coming year’s zodiac animal (according to the oriental zodiac calendar, 2015 is the year of the sheep). Buddhist temple bells chime 108 times as the New Year is rung in, supposedly so that 108 different types of human weakness are not carried forward to the next year.

Throwing Furniture

If you plan on starting the new year in South Africa, watch out for falling furniture and appliances! Residents of Johannesburg, throw old furniture and other household items out of their windows on New Year’s Eve in an effort to not be tied down by old attachments in the New Year.

Casting Tin

From throwing furniture, to messing about with molten metal. Finnish people pour melted tin into water at the stroke of the New Year. The tin sets and hardens as it hits the water, and people interpret the resultant shapes and predict how the new year will play out. A ring or a heart shape implies marriage. A pig might signify good food or wealth.

Bare Minimum

You’re probably wondering what you’ll wear this New Year. If you happen to be in Bolivia, Ecuador or some other South American countries, that decision would be way simpler. All you would really have to wear is coloured underwear to determine your fate for the new year. The most popular colours are red for romance, and yellow for wealth.

Fight Club

In some villages in Peru, the locals end the year with a fist fight festival to settle their differences. Way to start the New Year off on a clean slate!

Travel Light

In Colombia people carry empty suitcases around with them, starting New Year’s Eve, to ensure that the coming year is filled with travel and adventure. Sounds like something I should be doing the 31st!

Up in The Air

In Denmark, people climb on top of chairs and welcome the New Year by jumping off at the stroke of midnight, to bring good luck. They (usually) set their drinks down on the table before doing this.

The Power of Loaf

In Ireland people pound the walls of their homes with loaves of bread, to protect themselves from evil spirits.

Graveyard Camp

Locals in central Chile welcome the New Year in the company of their dead relatives. The tradition is said to have started when a family broke in one year to be near their dead father on New Year’s Eve.

As you can see, people around the world have different ways to bring in the New Year. Choose your favourite, make up your own tradition, or mix and match a few from different countries and welcome 2015 with your Yaars, some weird global New Year traditions and a sip of McDowell's No.1!

Image Credit: giphy.com

LiveInStyle.com encourages you to Party Responsibly!

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