Bacon Hakka Noodles for the Kung Fu Panda in you

Chinese food remains one of the favourite eat-out options in India. An all time favourite dish to order in Chinese restaurants in India is the ‘Hakka noodles’. Versions differ from restaurant to restaurant but we are talking of stir fried noodles similar to the Malaysian & Singaporean Chinese Hokkien Mee here.

Apart from being delicious Hakka noodles is fairly easy to make at home and even a novice, lazy guy can manage it. It’s a one dish meal which is so full flavoured that you can have it straight off the wok and doesn’t need a side dish. Beats ordering in too as this way your dish will be nice and hot this way when you sit down to eat.

This recipe includes cold cuts that cut down your cooking time even further. You could use bacon which adds a bewitching flavour to the dish. Or sausages which add a chunky meatiness to it. The locally available sausages are different from the sweet Chinese sausages but go well with noodles. Or you could try ham. Pork is of course the best though you now get chicken cold cuts too. Makes sense to keep these stocked in the fridge so all you have to do is reach in, take out the meat of your fancy out and start cooking.

Try the Hakka noodles here and don’t be surprised if it becomes your comfort food and a companion through these monsoon evenings that trap you at home.

Recipe for 2

Ingredients:

  • 200 g store Hakka noodles
  • 200 g bacon (or sausages)
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon dark chilli sauce, 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon each of chopped ginger and garlic
  • 1 teaspoon vinegar or juice of half a lime
  • 1 tablespoon salt, 1 teaspoon crushed black pepper
  • Veggies: 1 coffee mug full of juliennes of carrots, bell peppers, shredded cabbage, chopped spring onions, sprouts, split chillies
  • Prep:

  • Boil water in a pan, add 200 g locally available Hakka noodles to the boiling water. Keep prodding the noodles with a fork. Drain the water out using a strainer the moment the noodles loses its stiffness. This will take 2 to 4 minutes. Run the drained noodles under cold water.
  • 200 g finely chopped sausage, cut into rings or 200 g bacon - tear out strips of rind with fat. Finely chop the rest
  • Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in the wok, break in an egg and beat it with a ladle so it scrambles. Set aside.
  • Cook:

  • Heat two tablespoons of vegetable oil
  • Add some chopped garlic, slivers of ginger
  • Add the rinds of bacon (or sausage rings), reduce the flame. Slowly stir. Some of the fat will dissolve a bit and join the oil. This form the taste foundation of the dish
  • Add a tablespoon each of dark soy sauce and chilli sauce to the oil. The oil will slowly take on the colour and flavour of the sauces
  • Now move the meat to a side of the pan. Add half the noodles at the base of the pan
  • Add a tablespoon of salt and a teaspoon of black pepper on the noodles
  • Slowly shift the meat to the top of the noodles
  • Place the rest of the noodles on top of the meat. This sandwich-like arrangement ensures that the flavours of the condiments, meats and sauces spread all through
  • Toss the noodles till the colours of the meat and sauce have spread all through
  • Add finely chopped veggies - juliennes of carrots, bell peppers, cabbage, sprouts, split green chillies
  • Mix it through the noodles and the meat. The vegetables should be cooked to the point where they retain their crunch. This bit won’t take more than 1 minute
  • Pour a tablespoon of vinegar and stir. Or squeeze in half a lime
  • Top with a pre-fried beaten egg and serve
  • Master this dish and impress every single person that visits you for dinner.

    Article and photos by – Kalyan Karmakar

    Kalyan Karmakar will travel to any lengths for a good meal starting with his own kitchen. He is a consumer insights and social media specialist. He documents his food and travel stories in his blog www.finelychopped.net He considers it his life’s mission to give men the confidence to cook so that they don’t have to depend on anyone else to eat well. He lives in Mumbai.

    Follow him - @finelychopped

    four seasons wine food pairing

    Four Seasons Recommends -

    Chinese cuisine has a great affinity to Four Season Rosé wine. As it is a blend of Shiraz and Zinfandel grape, it has pronounced fruity aromas with velvety touch.

    Serve it chilled around 8°c with this dish.

    Bacon Hakka Noodles for the Kung Fu Panda in you

    Kalyan Karmakar

    Chinese food remains one of the favourite eat-out options in India. An all time favourite dish to order in Chinese restaurants in India is the ‘Hakka noodles’. Versions differ from restaurant to restaurant but we are talking of stir fried noodles similar to the Malaysian & Singaporean Chinese Hokkien Mee here.

    Apart from being delicious Hakka noodles is fairly easy to make at home and even a novice, lazy guy can manage it. It’s a one dish meal which is so full flavoured that you can have it straight off the wok and doesn’t need a side dish. Beats ordering in too as this way your dish will be nice and hot this way when you sit down to eat.

    This recipe includes cold cuts that cut down your cooking time even further. You could use bacon which adds a bewitching flavour to the dish. Or sausages which add a chunky meatiness to it. The locally available sausages are different from the sweet Chinese sausages but go well with noodles. Or you could try ham. Pork is of course the best though you now get chicken cold cuts too. Makes sense to keep these stocked in the fridge so all you have to do is reach in, take out the meat of your fancy out and start cooking.

    Try the Hakka noodles here and don’t be surprised if it becomes your comfort food and a companion through these monsoon evenings that trap you at home.

    Recipe for 2

    Ingredients:

  • 200 g store Hakka noodles
  • 200 g bacon (or sausages)
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon dark chilli sauce, 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon each of chopped ginger and garlic
  • 1 teaspoon vinegar or juice of half a lime
  • 1 tablespoon salt, 1 teaspoon crushed black pepper
  • Veggies: 1 coffee mug full of juliennes of carrots, bell peppers, shredded cabbage, chopped spring onions, sprouts, split chillies
  • Prep:

  • Boil water in a pan, add 200 g locally available Hakka noodles to the boiling water. Keep prodding the noodles with a fork. Drain the water out using a strainer the moment the noodles loses its stiffness. This will take 2 to 4 minutes. Run the drained noodles under cold water.
  • 200 g finely chopped sausage, cut into rings or 200 g bacon - tear out strips of rind with fat. Finely chop the rest
  • Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in the wok, break in an egg and beat it with a ladle so it scrambles. Set aside.
  • Cook:

  • Heat two tablespoons of vegetable oil
  • Add some chopped garlic, slivers of ginger
  • Add the rinds of bacon (or sausage rings), reduce the flame. Slowly stir. Some of the fat will dissolve a bit and join the oil. This form the taste foundation of the dish
  • Add a tablespoon each of dark soy sauce and chilli sauce to the oil. The oil will slowly take on the colour and flavour of the sauces
  • Now move the meat to a side of the pan. Add half the noodles at the base of the pan
  • Add a tablespoon of salt and a teaspoon of black pepper on the noodles
  • Slowly shift the meat to the top of the noodles
  • Place the rest of the noodles on top of the meat. This sandwich-like arrangement ensures that the flavours of the condiments, meats and sauces spread all through
  • Toss the noodles till the colours of the meat and sauce have spread all through
  • Add finely chopped veggies - juliennes of carrots, bell peppers, cabbage, sprouts, split green chillies
  • Mix it through the noodles and the meat. The vegetables should be cooked to the point where they retain their crunch. This bit won’t take more than 1 minute
  • Pour a tablespoon of vinegar and stir. Or squeeze in half a lime
  • Top with a pre-fried beaten egg and serve
  • Master this dish and impress every single person that visits you for dinner.

    Article and photos by – Kalyan Karmakar

    Kalyan Karmakar will travel to any lengths for a good meal starting with his own kitchen. He is a consumer insights and social media specialist. He documents his food and travel stories in his blog www.finelychopped.net He considers it his life’s mission to give men the confidence to cook so that they don’t have to depend on anyone else to eat well. He lives in Mumbai.

    Follow him - @finelychopped

    four seasons wine food pairing

    Four Seasons Recommends -

    Chinese cuisine has a great affinity to Four Season Rosé wine. As it is a blend of Shiraz and Zinfandel grape, it has pronounced fruity aromas with velvety touch.

    Serve it chilled around 8°c with this dish.

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