Make Your Evenings Special with Five Lesser Known Cocktails

The menus of most of the bars and restaurants feature almost the same popular cocktails. Rarely will you come across a drink that is rare and exclusive? Besides, such atypical drinks are seldom tasty and may be frowned upon as bartending experiments that went wrong.

Yet some of these rare libations are utterly delicious that will make youmove over the glory of popular concoctions. These rare cocktails include almost all ingredients that are available off the shelf. However, their creators have managed to strike out some unique combinations that convert the regular spirits, fruit juices, and sweeteners into pleasant, lip-smacking concoctions.

We have managed to scour the pages of history and menus of several bars to present you with these five lesser known yet thoroughlyindulging cocktails.

Bijou

This is one of the popular Prohibition Era cocktails which first appeared in the Bartender’s Manual of Harry Johnson in 1900. The drink was first made by blending gin, sweet vermouth, and green chartreuse in equal parts. It is a lavish drink known for its sweet, herbaceous flavours that overwhelm the taste buds and minds of most first-time cocktail revellers.

Pink Lady

Do not mistake this drink to betoo mild & lemony for your palate. For decades, this light drink has been favoured by women for its strikinglysweet and tangy flavours. Pink Lady gets its light pink hue from grenadine and egg white, while light gin and lime juice add the tangy taste. To make the drink strong and elating, some bartenders use Gin.

Twelve Mile Limit

This is another prohibition era recipe that beguiled the taste buds of thousands around the world. This strong drink is made by blending whisky, brandy, rum, and grenadine;it gets its tangy flavours with a dash of lime juice. The original recipe encourages the use of Canadian rye whisky; however, blended whisky makes this cocktail taste just as delightful.

Vancouver

Though it was created at Sylvia hotel in Vancouver, this Canadian delight is named after the British Columbian Megalopolis. It was inspired by the classic Martinez, and blends together gin, sweet vermouth, and Benedictine. Bartenders love to give this drink their personal touch by playing with types and proportion of vermouth used.

Image Credit: wordpress.com, hicocktail.com, saveur.com, canada.com

LiveInStyle.com encourages you to Party Responsibly!

 

Make Your Evenings Special with Five Lesser Known Cocktails

Liveinstyle

The menus of most of the bars and restaurants feature almost the same popular cocktails. Rarely will you come across a drink that is rare and exclusive? Besides, such atypical drinks are seldom tasty and may be frowned upon as bartending experiments that went wrong.

Yet some of these rare libations are utterly delicious that will make youmove over the glory of popular concoctions. These rare cocktails include almost all ingredients that are available off the shelf. However, their creators have managed to strike out some unique combinations that convert the regular spirits, fruit juices, and sweeteners into pleasant, lip-smacking concoctions.

We have managed to scour the pages of history and menus of several bars to present you with these five lesser known yet thoroughlyindulging cocktails.

Bijou

This is one of the popular Prohibition Era cocktails which first appeared in the Bartender’s Manual of Harry Johnson in 1900. The drink was first made by blending gin, sweet vermouth, and green chartreuse in equal parts. It is a lavish drink known for its sweet, herbaceous flavours that overwhelm the taste buds and minds of most first-time cocktail revellers.

Pink Lady

Do not mistake this drink to betoo mild & lemony for your palate. For decades, this light drink has been favoured by women for its strikinglysweet and tangy flavours. Pink Lady gets its light pink hue from grenadine and egg white, while light gin and lime juice add the tangy taste. To make the drink strong and elating, some bartenders use Gin.

Twelve Mile Limit

This is another prohibition era recipe that beguiled the taste buds of thousands around the world. This strong drink is made by blending whisky, brandy, rum, and grenadine;it gets its tangy flavours with a dash of lime juice. The original recipe encourages the use of Canadian rye whisky; however, blended whisky makes this cocktail taste just as delightful.

Vancouver

Though it was created at Sylvia hotel in Vancouver, this Canadian delight is named after the British Columbian Megalopolis. It was inspired by the classic Martinez, and blends together gin, sweet vermouth, and Benedictine. Bartenders love to give this drink their personal touch by playing with types and proportion of vermouth used.

Image Credit: wordpress.com, hicocktail.com, saveur.com, canada.com

LiveInStyle.com encourages you to Party Responsibly!

 

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