Exploring Scotch Whisky

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Peep into the divergences of your favourite drink.

Regarded as the world’s most venerated spirits, Scotch Whisky is pure mystic! There is no right or wrong way of drinking this classic drink, nor is it obligatory to decide which variety is better than the other. It’s completely one’s personal preference. Sometimes happens to be love at first sight while sometimes it could be a cultivated or acquired taste. There are diverse types of whisky, each delightfully scrumptious in its own demeanor. Let’s take a deep dive into the world of Scotch and explore its multitude of tastes and forms. 

The striking differences between the varieties ultimately boil down to a single reason - geography. Each region is known for unique flavours owing to the blends of the local distilleries.

Speyside Malt Whisky: Half of Scotland’s malt whisky distilleries dwell in Speyside. This petite area of land located to the North West of Aberdeen yields smooth, sugary, malty and predominantly fruity malt whiskies.

Island Malt Whisky: Stretched from the Orkney Islands, the Islands are situated off the north coast of Scotland. Due to its coastal clout, Island Malt Whisky produces more of stout whiskies.

Islay Whisky: Islay distilleries are located on the south coast of Islay. The distilleries in this region produce heavy peaty, smoky soggy, malts in particular.

Highland Whisky: A variety of characteristics can be found in the Highland Malt whiskies as it consists of rest of the mainland Scotland. Its whiskies range from dry and heathery to sweet and fruity; some remain smoky due to its closeness to the west coast.

Lowland Whisky: Lowland whisky is based in south of a fictional line drawn from the Clyde estuary, on the west coast, to the Tay estuary, on the east coast.  Whiskies and distilleries here are much softer and lighter in quality, exhibiting very malty, grassy characteristics and exquisite fragile aromas than whiskies from other regions.

Campbeltown Whisky: It’s mostly found in in Western Highlands and the Lowlands. Dry and gentle smoky, Campbeltown whisky endeavors salty character, considering its immediacy to the coast. Right now, there are just three whisky distilleries in Campbeltown.

All you Scotch lovers it's time to raise a toast... Indulge yourself and invigorate your senses in this supreme gift of Scotland!

Image Credit: dailyrecord.uk, travelsignposts.com

LiveInStyle.com encourages you to Party Responsibly!

 

Exploring Scotch Whisky

Liveinstyle

Peep into the divergences of your favourite drink.

Regarded as the world’s most venerated spirits, Scotch Whisky is pure mystic! There is no right or wrong way of drinking this classic drink, nor is it obligatory to decide which variety is better than the other. It’s completely one’s personal preference. Sometimes happens to be love at first sight while sometimes it could be a cultivated or acquired taste. There are diverse types of whisky, each delightfully scrumptious in its own demeanor. Let’s take a deep dive into the world of Scotch and explore its multitude of tastes and forms. 

The striking differences between the varieties ultimately boil down to a single reason - geography. Each region is known for unique flavours owing to the blends of the local distilleries.

Speyside Malt Whisky: Half of Scotland’s malt whisky distilleries dwell in Speyside. This petite area of land located to the North West of Aberdeen yields smooth, sugary, malty and predominantly fruity malt whiskies.

Island Malt Whisky: Stretched from the Orkney Islands, the Islands are situated off the north coast of Scotland. Due to its coastal clout, Island Malt Whisky produces more of stout whiskies.

Islay Whisky: Islay distilleries are located on the south coast of Islay. The distilleries in this region produce heavy peaty, smoky soggy, malts in particular.

Highland Whisky: A variety of characteristics can be found in the Highland Malt whiskies as it consists of rest of the mainland Scotland. Its whiskies range from dry and heathery to sweet and fruity; some remain smoky due to its closeness to the west coast.

Lowland Whisky: Lowland whisky is based in south of a fictional line drawn from the Clyde estuary, on the west coast, to the Tay estuary, on the east coast.  Whiskies and distilleries here are much softer and lighter in quality, exhibiting very malty, grassy characteristics and exquisite fragile aromas than whiskies from other regions.

Campbeltown Whisky: It’s mostly found in in Western Highlands and the Lowlands. Dry and gentle smoky, Campbeltown whisky endeavors salty character, considering its immediacy to the coast. Right now, there are just three whisky distilleries in Campbeltown.

All you Scotch lovers it's time to raise a toast... Indulge yourself and invigorate your senses in this supreme gift of Scotland!

Image Credit: dailyrecord.uk, travelsignposts.com

LiveInStyle.com encourages you to Party Responsibly!

 

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